Society for History Education, Inc.
A non-profit organization and publisher of The History Teacher

The History Teacher
(ISSN: 0018-2745)
is a peer-reviewed
quarterly journal.

THT publishes inspirational scholarship on traditional and unconventional techniques
in history education.

Volume 54 (2020-2021)
is delivered internationally
in print to members of the
non-profit organization, the
Society for History Education.


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The History Teacher
The Print Edition
Volume 54
2020-2021


The History Teacher cover

The History Teacher
Volume 54, No. 3
May 2021

The History Teacher

Volume 54, No. 3
May 2021
thehistoryteacher.org/M21

Front Cover: Leaves from a Bad Girl's Diary [Title Page], by Ella E. Bower. Chicago, IL: Owens Publishing Co., 1884. Library of Congress, Selected Digitized Books, Control No. 06016089. Image 5 of 94. https://www.loc.gov/item/06016089/.

Back Cover: Leaves from a Bad Girl's Diary [Page 4], by Ella E. Bower. Chicago, IL: Owens Publishing Co., 1884. Library of Congress, Selected Digitized Books, Control No. 06016089. Image 10 of 94. https://www.loc.gov/item/06016089/.

Diaries, letters, and other such primary sources offer historians the opportunity for first-hand, in-depth, intimate perspectives from the past. With respect to the discipline of history, we strive to conduct thorough, responsible research in order to contribute to the hallowed halls of Academia. Yet we must also consider the respect owed to our subjects—those individuals who authored such deeply personal (and presumably private) accounts.

In the Introduction to Leaves from a Bad Girl's Diary, editor E. E. Bower writes, "when I first knew Eliza Jane Smith, she was a little girl about 11 years old, and her diary covers a space of some two years" (p. 3). According to Bower, Eliza's diary was inscribed in a secret code of sorts, "all written in her peculiar system of short-hand writing, but when I was determined to translate it, she kindly gave me the key" (p. 83). If Bower is to be believed, Eliza consented to this particular publication of her private thoughts and admissions.

However, Bower also offers an admission of her own—in effect, a confession of plotting academic blackmail: "I hear that, as she grew older, she occasionally wrote in another account book, just like the first one. I am going to see her and threaten to tell her real name unless she gives it to me, to rewrite for the benefit of humanity" (p. 3). One can hope this is simply sarcasm rather than truly sinister.

We hope you and your students will benefit from the possibilities presented in this edition of The History Teacher, including a special focus on Personal Histories and Games and Role-Play.


The History Teacher
Volume 54, No. 3
May 2021

Front Matter | Back Matter

THE CRAFT OF TEACHING

Personal Histories

Navigating through the Civil War with Diaries in Hand: The Diaries of Two Company Clerks in the 17th Wisconsin Infantry
  by Daniel Kotzin   (pp. 409-442)

Women's History Students Learn About Race Through Memoir: Anne Moody's Coming of Age in Mississippi
  by Jessica B. Schocker   (pp. 443-472)

Alternative Strategies for Family History Projects: Rethinking Practice in Light of Indigenous Perspectives
  by Meredith L. McCoy, Leilani Sabzalian, and Tommy Ender   (pp. 473-508)

Games and Role-Play

Making History Come Alive: The Boston Massacre Trials
  by Julie Anne Sweet   (pp. 509-538)

The Possibilities and Problems of Sid Meier's Civilization in History Classrooms
  by Matt King   (pp. 539-567)

Game of Thrones and Gaming the History Classroom
  by Sarah M. Spalding   (pp. 569-590)

IN EVERY ISSUE

406   Contributors to The History Teacher
408   The History of The History Teacher
597   Questionnaire for Potential Reviewers
598   Membership/Subscription Information
600   Submission Guidelines for The History Teacher

ADVERTISERS IN THIS ISSUE

568   Duke University Press: Ethnohistory
591   Association for Asian Studies: Attend an AAS Conference
592   Society for History Education: The Eugene Asher Award
594   Society for History Education: The Richard & Louise Wilde Award
595   Society for History Education: Celebrating 50 Years


CONTRIBUTORS

Tommy Ender (Muisca descent) is an Assistant Professor of Educational Studies and History at Rhode Island College. Ender was previously a middle school and high school history teacher and post-doctoral fellow at Loyola University Maryland. He received his doctorate in Education from The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

Matt King is an Assistant Professor of Medieval History and Digital Humanities at the University of South Florida. His research focuses on interfaith interactions across the medieval Mediterranean through the analysis of written texts in dialogue with digital and environmental data. He was also fortunate to teach the course "History and Video Games" at the University of Minnesota, which inspired his article in this issue.

Daniel P. Kotzin received his Ph.D. in History from New York University. He is a Professor of History at Medaille College. Kotzin's biography, Judah L. Magnes: An American Jewish Nonconformist, was published by Syracuse University Press. He has also published articles and reviews on teaching history in The History Teacher and Teaching History: A Journal of Methods. His current research is focused on Irish soldiers in the Union Army.

Meredith McCoy (Turtle Mountain Band of Chippewa descent) is an Assistant Professor and Andersen Fellow of American Studies and History at Carleton College. McCoy has previously worked as a middle school teacher, a Policy Assistant at the White House Initiative on American Indian and Alaska Native Education, and an instructor at both Turtle Mountain Community College and Freedom University. She received her doctorate in American Studies from The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

Leilani Sabzalian (Alutiiq) is an Assistant Professor of Indigenous Studies in Education and Co-Director of the Sapsik'ʷałá Teacher Education Program at the University of Oregon. Sabzalian's research focuses on creating spaces to support Indigenous students and Indigenous self-determination in public schools, and preparing teachers to challenge colonialism in curriculum, policy, and practice.

Jessica Schocker (Ph.D., Educational Psychology, Temple University) is an Associate Professor of Social Studies Education and Women's Studies at Penn State Berks, where she teaches courses in social studies education, education foundations and politics, women's history, and critical race theory. Before moving into higher education, Schocker was a high school history teacher. Her research focuses on the inclusion of women, particularly women of color, in teaching history. She is also interested in critical approaches to teacher education and civic engagement among urban youth and their teachers.

Sarah M. Spalding received her Ph.D. in Medieval History from The Catholic University of America. She is currently serving as the Associate Dean for the College of Business, Innovation, Leadership, and Technology at Marymount University, and also teaches history courses for School of Humanities. Her research interests include gender, religious reform, and intellectual culture in the high middle ages.

Julie Anne Sweet received her Ph.D. in History from the University of Kentucky in 2002 and is currently a Professor of History at Baylor University in Waco, Texas, where she specializes in colonial and revolutionary America. She double-majored in History and Theatre at the University of Notre Dame as an undergraduate, which explains her unique approach to teaching, and worked in public history at Jamestown Island and Colonial Williamsburg before embarking on her academic career.


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The History Teacher
Volume 54, No. 3
May 2021


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Gaming in the
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